Friday, October 20, 2017

The Domestic Yapoo Chapter 1



Alright, this took me long enough, with a HUGE thanks to Molokidan for his exemplary translation

Past and future collide! A pair of lovers named Rin and Clara stumble upon...a visitor from another time, only it's not the most...pleasant time.

As Molo informs me, this was written shortly after WW2 ended, and can be seen as a sort of political outcry, although it does contain a bit of...well, you might see that maybe Shotaro Ishinomori was an influence on Go Nagai in unexpected ways. The shocking part is the fact that Ishinomori made this into a manga in the 70s. You've been warned.

The Domestic Yapoo Chapter 1

13 comments:

  1. Thanks!

    I'm not sure what I just read, or why Ishinomori of all people decided to make an adaption of an S&M novel, but I'm intrigued.

    By the way, there's an error on page 31/0037 copy, last panel, there's an untranslated kanji left in the middle text bubble.

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  2. Two things worthy of being mentioned:
    1) This is an adaptation of a novel by Shouzou Numa, the pseudonym of a mysterious writer whose identity was never revealed. So the whole kinky/SM aspect comes from there, not Ishinomori per se.
    2) Tatsuya Egawa of Golden Boy and Magical Taluluto-kun fame has also adapted the book in 2003.

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  3. Now that I'm actually looking at the scans, I realize there's something else that's worth pointing out: the books reads left-to-right, like a US or European comic. For some reason, Ishinomori opted for the western reading order. Maybe to stay in sync with the book's East vs West themes?

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  4. Hasn't this already been scanlated?

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  5. The first 8 chapters (up to page 272) have already been scanlated. There's a second volume that's not been translated yet, though, and I look forward to happyscans to catch up to that part of the story.

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  6. Of course Ishinomori was an influence on Go Nagai, because Nagai was Shotarou's assistant in the beginning of his career.

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  7. Unfortunately, the following volumes were not drawn by Ishinomori, but by one of his assistants, Sugar Sato, who also worked on later parts of Cyborg 009 Conclusion God's War. Sato's artwork kinda shows, but I would still be glad to see a follow up to this. Ishinomori always enjoyed experimenting with new things, so I'm not so surprised he picked up a title like this. He made a lot of erotic comics by himself like Sexuadoll, Amazon Baby, and Vampila. Even a collection of these kind of stories called Eros X Sf was released in France a few years ago.

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  8. OK, my first comment disappeared in the ether, so here goes nothing... again...
    Yapoo is based on a novel by anonymous author Shozo Numa (a pseudonym). That's where the kinky SM concepts come from, not Ishinomori himself, so the Nagai connection, beyond their master-pupil relation, is a moot point. I don't think the human dogs from Violence Jack are influenced by Yapoo, and if it was, nothing confirms it would be from Ishinomori's version specifically.

    This version by Ishinomori lasts one volume. I'm not sure the Sugar Sato version is a direct follow-up. It's made of three books with different titles:

    - Kachikujin Yapoo, akumu no nihon-shi (1984)
    - Kachikujin Yapoo, kairaku no cho SM Bunmei (1993)
    - Kachikujin Yapoo, mujoken no kôfuku (1994)

    The other scan floating on the web is mujoken no kôfuku. I'm not sure the first two books have been scanned.

    Also, Yapoo has been adapted in a 9-volume manga by Tatsuya Egawa of Magical Taluluto-kun and Golden Boy fame. *He* was totally influenced by Shozo Numa, I think, and it shows in Golden Boy.

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    Replies
    1. How many pages does this first volume have? I have a 2 volume edition with about 250 pages each and a total of 15 chapters and Ishinomori is definitely identified as the artist on both volumes.

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  9. Just for clarification, all 4 of those volumes complete the original Yapoo story that was published as a novel. It's all continuous, Sugar Sato just finished what Ishinomori started, he didn't remake it or anything. I don't know why they didn't number the volumes, but I've read through them.

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